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Child custody, visitation and bird nesting

Dealing with child custody and visitation issues during and after divorce are perhaps the most challenging things a parent can face. Yet, many American parents face this tough reality. Sometimes, though, they are able to work out custody and visitation agreements amicably. Many parents are able to utilize these agreements to ensure that they maintain their bond and relationship with their child. However, in some instances this simply is not the case.Regardless of a parent’s situation, creative thinking is often necessary to reach adequate child custody and visitation arrangements. One way to do this is to engage in what is often referred to as “bird nesting.” This is a process by which parents keep a familial home so that children can maintain a sense of stability while the parents rotate in and out of the home according to a pre-arranged schedule. Of course, this can be challenging for parents, as they oftentimes will share a separate residence such as an apartment so that they can stay there when it is not their time to stay with the children in the familial home.This kind of arrangement can be beneficial to children because it allows them to stay in the same school, keep their same friends, see their parents regularly and be comfortable in the home that they have grown accustomed to. However, some experts warn that long term nesting can be detrimental to parents’ relationships and their relationships with their children. This can be especially true when one parent begins a relationship with another individual. After all, one parent may be hurt and find it problematic when it is their turn to reside in the familial home with the children and they see signs of a boyfriend or girlfriend having spent significant time there with the children. Additionally, long-term nesting can leave children unsure of what the future holds with regard to their parents living arrangements, their living arrangements and their parents’ relationship. Therefore, many experts recommend utilizing the nesting technique for only three months to six months.Child custody and visitation issues can be enormously complex depending on the facts at hand. By utilizing creative thinking and addressing issues head-on, an individual can ensure that he or she reaches an agreement that furthers the children’s best interest. When these types of arrangements cannot be negotiated with the other parent, then the parents will likely have to take the matter to court and litigate the issue in front of a judge. Whether an individual is able to negotiate a resolution or must litigate it, the assistance of a skilled family law attorney often proves beneficial.